Author Topic: BASH Ultimate is pretty cool!  (Read 1703 times)

Particle_Man

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BASH Ultimate is pretty cool!
« on: June 25, 2013, 03:10:19 pm »
Basic Action Super Heroes.  It has a lighter crunch than Mutants and Masterminds, and still does what I like in a Superhero game.

Interestingly, the rules for experience points are optional - like the comic books from which the heroes come, you could play a character that simply doesn't change that much over time, mechanically.

I think that can work.  It does mean you have to make sure you character is one you want to play from the get go, rather than a "he sucks now but someday will be awesome!" type of 4-D lifeplan character, but as long as players know that going in, it should not be a problem.  Especially for the sorts of short term campaigns that ubcwargamers favours.

There are three stats, and most things roll off 2d6 x a multiplier (often the stat, which usually varies from 1 to 5, with 1 being normal and 2 being peak human (for the two physical stats, at least)).

Anyhow, I recommend people give it a look. 
Game MASter that is comPLETEly unfair!

Particle_Man

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Re: BASH Ultimate is pretty cool!
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2013, 04:30:54 pm »
Anyhow, here is an example character "The Cheetah" (totally not the flash) - I am actually borrowing most of it from one of the example characters at the back of the book.

This is a 25 point character which is about the "Save the City!" level (20 pts being old pulp heroes, 40 pts being "Save the World!" level and 60 points being Cosmic "Save the Universe!" level.

Stats are bought at a cost of 2 points per stat.  So Brawn 1 is 2 points, Mind 1 is 2 points and Agility 5 is a whopping 10 points but that is the price of being the fastest felinophile alive.  So that is 14 points gone!

The other 11 points go into Powers, naturally.  5 Points goes into Super-Running.  This is a Maintained power so if I take damage it cuts out until I activate it again (but they have to hit me first!).  It means I can run up to 40 squares per "panel" (which is an action) and at that speed I can run up vertical surfaces or run across liquids. 

Another 5 points goes into Super-Speed.  This one lets me take 3 panels (or actions) per page (or round), or else get a +2 agility bonus when taking 1 panel per page.  I also get a similar bonus for extended actions and can in general do mental tasks 5 times faster and physical tasks a whopping 25 times faster (the latter two are based on my mind and agility scores - thus it would be viable to make a character that does move that fast but can *think* very quickly).  Now this ability is very powerful but it comes with a build in liability - it is "tiring" so I cannot keep it up for more than 2 pages in a row without "pushing" myself (effectively, taking damage - it would cost 10 hits and I start with 100).  Fair enough - this is more of a Not-Jay Garrick than a Not-Barry Allen then.

1 point left goes into: Special Attack, which is a catch-all that can apply to blasters or punchers or whatever.  In my case the flavour text is "barrage" so lots of high-speed punches, increasing the damage.  The liability that comes with it is "immobile" so I can't move around if I am doing that.  It pushes my damage multiplier for punches from x1 to x3, which is good when I have run out of minions and need to try to hit the Big Bad.

Some characters can take a weakness for a few extra points but this one doesn't.  Also, unspent points count as hero points, which can be used to do cool things.  If I had over spent, then that gives the GM free villain points to do mean things to my poor character.  But at 25 it balances out.

Not quite done yet!  There are also advantages and disadvantages (and you can take as many as you want as long as you take an equal number of each).  I could take Versatility which allows me once per issue (or adventure session) to make up something cool that I could do with my powers, like "vibrate my molecules to go through walls" and then I would have that power for the rest of the scene, all without spending the Hero Die that this normally costs.  I also take Instant Change so I can get into my costume quickly.  Perhaps a ring that holds my costume inside it . . .  As for disadvantages, Romantic Interest and Rogues Gallery (3 recurring villains that between them get one villain die, and each are no less than 20 points (given that I am 25)) - both themes familiar to speedsters both make for good plot hooks (and flags to tell the game master (narrator) what I want to have happen with my character).

Finally there are skills.  Because my agility is 5 and my mind 1, I get 5 physical skills and 1 mental skill, respectively.  For the mental skill I choose Investigation with a specialty in finding clues (specialties mean you get to roll twice and take the higher result).  Maybe my character is a police officer?  Or a mild mannered reporter?.  For the physical skills, I chose Athletics with a speciality in Running (duh!) and Stealth with 4 specialties (Hiding, Prowling, Shadowing and Evading Security Cameras/Alarms) - so my character has a sneaky streak.  The skill rolls are basically my ability rolls.  Not having a skill would make it as if my ability were one less.

So lets get to that roll.  For most ability and skill rolls, I roll 2d6, "exploding" on doubles (roll 1d6 more and add, continue to "explode" if the number I roll matches the number that originally got doubled).  I might add a bonus, if one applies here.  Then I take that sum and multiply it by Brawn, Agility or Mind, as appopriate.  After that, I might further modify it by adding a bonus (this is not as big as a bonus added before multiplying it, but every little bit helps).  So with an agility of 5, if I am rolling to hit someone, I roll 2d6.  If I got 4 and 2 on the dice I would add them to get 6 and then multiply by my agility (x5) for a score of 30. 

If I had a multiplier of 0 (like rolling a mind skill that I don't have a skill in), I would roll 1d6, "exploding" on a 6.  No multipliers here.  Generally, that would be a low roll.  ;)

Combat is pretty simple.  A rolls (usually an Agility roll, but it could be Mind for mental attacks) to hit B and B rolls defense to not be hit by A.  If A gets higher, B could be hit.  Then A rolls damage (usually Brawn) and B rolls to soak that damage (also Brawn) and if A gets higher than B, the difference is subracted from B's hits (like hit points).

Anyhow, if you have any questions, let me know.

If you want to try it out, let me know too.
Game MASter that is comPLETEly unfair!